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Reblogged from nicomalt
peonyandbee:

nicomalt: Nicolás Dupont Hase | rabbit, 2014, oil on canvas, 100×80 cm

peonyandbee:

nicomaltNicolás Dupont Hase | rabbit, 2014, oil on canvas, 100×80 cm

(via yellowblog)

Reblogged from dokuroou

(Source: dokuroou, via yellowblog)

Reblogged from fuckyeahfluiddynamics
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

(via scientificillustration)

Reblogged from c-isnenegro

(via sho235711)

Reblogged from windypoplarsroom
windypoplarsroom:

Helga Aichinger

windypoplarsroom:

Helga Aichinger

(via yellowblog)

Reblogged from hicockalorum
hicockalorum:

Bear and the Wildcat
Komako Sakai 

hicockalorum:

Bear and the Wildcat

Komako Sakai 

Reblogged from michigrim

michigrim:

Tetravaal (2004) Directed by Neill Blomkamp

(via zzzsahmi)

Reblogged from laluzcurva

laluzcurva:

WILLIAM HEATH ROBINSON

Artista ingles

1872-1944

(via bibidebabideboo)

Reblogged from inspirationfeed
inspirationfeed:

We need more people like this. http://ift.tt/1x5z0kL

inspirationfeed:

We need more people like this. http://ift.tt/1x5z0kL

Reblogged from art-is-art-is-art
art-is-art-is-art:

At Close of Day, Maxfield Parrish

art-is-art-is-art:

At Close of Day, Maxfield Parrish

(via septoo)